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Happy Egg

Kentucky Deviled Eggs with Happy Egg

“This post is sponsored by Happy Egg Co., but all opinions are my own.”

Hey, y’all!

Many of you know that I am from rural Kentucky. This means that potlucks, church dinners, and various community luncheons were key parts to my growing up (let alone my introduction to the culinary world). These meals all had one thing in common: deviled eggs. From childhood, this Southern classic has been one of my very favorite foods – one that I avidly crave.

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I believe strongly that all eggs are not created equal. As a home cook, I value where my food is sourced from, the ethics behind the production, and the morals of the company.

Having been raised by a family with a history in farming, I am very interested in agricultural techniques. That is, hands down, where Happy Egg impresses me the most. Established in 1949, the Happy Egg Company is a trailblazer of the industry. They stand deeply behind their product and their methodology; this, in their opinion, should change how confident we should be, as consumers, in their eggs. To say that I agree would be a hyperbolic understatement.

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I feel that there are several misconceptions in the egg industry due to misleading marketing and framing. When an egg brand claims that they are “Organic”, hens have access to the outdoors. However, that can mean that they have access to a tiny door inside a crowded barn. When they claim to be “Standard Free Range”, to adhere to HFAC standards, the required minimum outdoor space is merely two square feet per bird. When brands are sold as “Cage Free”, hens do not live inside a wire cage, but this does not mean they go outside. It also doesn’t guarantee that conditions are cruelty-free. Lastly, unless packaging says otherwise, your eggs are coming from caged chickens. In this case, hens spend their entire lives indoors, shoved in overcrowded wire cages, without enough space to stretch their wings.

When I became fully aware of all of this, I got sick to my stomach. Luckily, I don’t have to worry about that as a Happy Egg customer. Their guarantee is that their eggs are the “Free-est of the Free Range” — each farm has over eight acres of outdoor access for their hens to forage freely each and every day. That is, for example, ten-times more square feet per bird, as compared to the average “Standard Free Range” eggs.

After buying a product that I believe in, it was time to head to the kitchen!

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Kentucky Deviled Eggs

Ingredients:

  • 12 Happy Eggs
  • 3 strips of bacon
  • 1/3 c. mayo
  • 3 tbsp. sweet pickle relish
  • 3 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp. yellow mustard
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • tabasco, to taste
  • paprika (garnish)

Directions:

  • Boil eggs, peel, cut in half, place yellows in a separate bowl.
  • Cook bacon until crispy, chop, sit aside.
  • Add mayo, sweet pickle relish, dijon mustard, yellow mustard, and sugar in the bowl with the yellows. Mix thoroughly.
  • Add salt, pepper, and tobasco to the mixture according to taste.preferences.
  • Spoon in the mixture to each halved egg white. For a cleaner presentation, you can use a piping bag, as if the deviled egg mixture was icing.
  • Garnish each egg with paprika and a slice (or two!) or chopped bacon.
  • Enjoy!

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I hope y’all love this recipe as much as I do. It is a tried and true crowd pleaser!

If you are in the Louisville area, you find them at Meijer (look for the iconic yellow packaging!); otherwise, use the store locator to find the closest Happy Eggs retailer to you! Happy Eggs can be purchased in two varieties: the “Free-est of Free” and the “Organic Free-est of Free.”

Be sure to follow @thehappyeggco on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest!

As always: Happy Eating, Happy Traveling, Happy Living!

Y’all come back now, ya hear?

My best,

JC

Appalachian Frittata With Happy Egg

FTC: This post is sponsored by Happy Egg Co, and all opinions are my own.

Hey, y’all!

Growing up in rural Kentucky, and having been raised on the family farmland, I have a deep interest in the agricultural industry. When it comes to sourcing my food, I think heavily about the ethical side of farming – it’s a rite of passage in my part of the world. What is the farm like? How are the animals treated?

A large part of Appalachian culture is storytelling. One of my favorite stories that my Grandma Judy tells me is about growing up on a free-range chicken farm. While that farm no longer exists, it’s great to see and to support companies like Happy Egg that keep the mission alive.

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The Happy Egg Company was established in 1949 and their legacy has endured ever since. They pride themselves on their methods, ethics, care, and conscientiousness – they clearly love their birds, which, in my mind, makes our decision as customers much easier.

When you purchase from Happy Egg, you are receiving a product from one of thirty-one small family farms in Missouri and Arkansas. Their guarantee is that their eggs are the “Free-est of the Free Range” — each farm has over eight acres of outdoor access for hens to forage freely each and every day. This is different from “cage free” eggs; on these farms, hens have no outdoor access.

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All their free-range hens are fed a wholesome vegetarian diet, which has been specifically designed by an animal nutritionist and tailored to the flock’s individual needs.

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Our family farm was homesteaded in 1798; for centuries, my family worked to promote Kentucky agriculture and agricultural education. While we no longer produce, this value is engrained in my spirit. Every time I crack a Happy Egg, I am assured that I am doing my part as an ethical consumer and the company is doing their part as a producer. That is a symbiosis that I cannot and will not take for granted.

Now, of course, I needed to use these eggs in a recipe; hence, say hello to my Appalachian Frittata! I prepared this in a cast iron skillet gifted to me by my grandmother and our special friend, Cletta. So special!

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Appalachian Frittata

Ingredients:

  • 8 Happy Eggs
  • 8 slices of bacon, cooked and chopped
  • 1 small vidalia onion, diced
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 green pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow pepper, diced
  • 1 roma tomato, sliced
  • 1 small package mushrooms, cooked
  • 1 16 oz. bag of cheddar cheese
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1.5 tsp. black pepper
  • 1.5 tsp, minced garlic
  • garlic powder, to taste
  • onion powder, to taste
  • everything but the bagel seasoning, to taste
  • red pepper flakes, to taste

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to broil setting.
  • In a cast iron skillet, cook the bacon. Remove from skillet and chop afterwards.
  • In the same skillet, sauté the diced peppers, onion, and mushrooms.
  • Using a separate large glass mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs. Add the salt, black pepper, minced garlic, garlic powder, onion powder, and red pepper flakes. Mix well. Then add the bag of cheddar cheese to the egg mixture, combining thoroughly.
  • Add the egg + cheese mixture to the sautéed veggies in the cast iron skillet. Allow to cook until the eggs set well on the bottom and begin to do so on top.
  • Add sliced roma tomatoes around the top of the pan.
  • Broil until browned, fluffy, and fully cooked. You can check with a toothpick – it should come out dry. Typically, this takes 3-5 minutes.
  • Top with red pepper flakes and everything but the bagel seasoning.

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Happy Eggs are the key to this recipe. They are healthier, taste better, and align with my farming values.

If you are in the Louisville area, you find them at Meijer (look for the iconic yellow packaging!); otherwise, use the store locator to find the closest Happy Eggs retailer to you! Happy Eggs can be purchased in two varieties: the “Free-est of the Free Range” and the “Organic Free-est of the Free Range.” Be sure to follow @happyeggcousa on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest!

As always, Happy Eating, Happy Traveling, Happy Living!

Y’all come back now, ya hear?

My best,

JC

 

 

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